12 Common Writing Errors Even Bestselling Authors Make

“12 Common Writing Errors Even Bestselling Authors Make” by Ricardo Fayet | 21st April, 2016. BookBub Insights.

“Have you ever bought a New York Times bestseller and found a typo or a glaring error? It’s happened to most of us. Errors can detract from the overall impression of quality readers expect of a published book. This can lead to negative reviews and low ratings, which can have an undesirable impact on sales.

The occasional error is practically inevitable in a finished manuscript, but striving for perfection is still a worthy aim. Understanding the most common mistakes can help authors approach their work and editing process with more clarity — and keep them from stumbling on common pitfalls.

At Reedsy, we work with experienced developmental editors, copy editors, and proofreaders. I asked them a simple question: “What’s the most common writing mistake you see even bestselling authors making?” You’ll find their answers below, from big-picture mistakes down to the nitty-gritty of grammar and punctuation.

  1. Show, don’t tell
  2. Weak opening narrative
  3. Over-describing the action
  4. Unbelievable conflicts
  5. Viewpoint
  6. Assumption of knowledge
  7. Misuse of punctuation
  8. Misplaced and “dangling” modifiers
  9. Disruptive or incorrect dialogue tags
  10. Inconsistencies in names and spelling
  11. Misuse of tense
  12. Homonym errors and commonly confused words.”

 

Read more via 12 Common Writing Errors Even Bestselling Authors Make

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Past Tense Or Present Tense? Which One Tells A Better Story?

medium_Present_and_past_tense“Past Tense or Present Tense? Which One Tells a Better Story” by Amanda Patterson | 29th March, 2016 | Writers Write

“Different tenses suit different stories, certain genres, and various authors’ styles. The tense you choose should also suit the personality of your main viewpoint character.

The Past And The Present

The past tells us what happened: I ached. She loved. You needed.

The present shows us what is happening: I ache. She loves. You need.

The past gives us some distance:
The boy looked up. The girl with the butterfly tattoo on her wrist twisted on the lawn and smiled at him. Her hair spread out like spilt milk on the grass. He knew he loved her  and he did not care if she knew. He wanted to carve her name into the clear sky that framed the edges of the park.
The present is immediate:
The boy looks up. The girl with the butterfly tattoo on her wrist twists on the sun splattered lawn and smiles at him. Her hair spreads out like spilt milk on the grass. He’s lost and he knows she knows, but he doesn’t care. He wants to carve her name into the clear sky that frames the edges of the park.”

Read more via Past Tense Or Present Tense? Which One Tells A Better Story? – Writers Write