Strange Horizons | Re-opening 7th August

sh-logoStrange Horizons
Genre: Speculative Fiction
Submissions Re-open: 7th August 2017
Length: Up to 10,000 words (under 5000 preferred)
Payment: 8¢/word USD

“We want good speculative fiction. If your story doesn’t have a speculative element, or strong speculative-fiction sensibilities, it’s probably not for us.

Some particular things we love, or are interested in:

  • Fiction from or about diverse perspectives and traditionally under-represented groups, settings, and cultures, written from a non-exoticizing and well-researched position.
  • Unusual yet readable styles and inventive structures and narratives.
  • Stories that address political issues in complex and nuanced ways, resisting oversimplification.
  • Hypertext fiction. If you have a work of hyperfiction you think might be a good fit for Strange Horizons, please query us to discuss how to submit it.”

Read more via Strange Horizons

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Scout | Ongoing Submissions

ScoutScout
Genre: Science Fiction – vignettes and short stories
Ongoing Submissions
Length: 250 – 2,000 words
Payment: 8 cents a word

Scout.ai, an online community that combines science fiction and journalism, is seeking speculative and science fiction vignettes that illustrate the social impacts of emerging technologies.”

“We’re especially interested in character-driven vignettes that explore the near-term impacts of artificial intelligence, automation, genetic augmentation, and space travel, and the impacts of technology on governance, climate, and social structures. We also enjoy being surprised by original or unexpected topics.

Thoughtful but accessible fiction will constitute the majority of our purchases, but there’s always room for humor. Also, a note that when we say near-term, we’re looking for vignettes that portray what you think will be viable or probable in the next 1-7 years. We realize there’s plenty of variability in that range based on human optimism and pessimism and we’re OK with that.

We often pair fiction with existing Scout reporting, but we’ve also been known to build Scout’s journalistic product around particularly compelling speculative or science fiction vignettes.”

Read more via Scout

Perihelion Science Fiction Magazine | Ongoing Submissions

logo-moonPerihelion: Online Science Fiction Magazine
Looking for: Fiction, Articles, Artwork
Ongoing Submissions
Length: 2,500 – 7,000 words
Payment: 1 cent a word up to a maximum of $75 per story
Artwork: 520 pixels wide by 1000 pixels high – $60 per image

“WE ARE LOOKING for well-written, original science fiction, that is, science fiction with a solid plot, a beginning, a middle, and an end (but not necessarily in that order). No fantasy. No horror. No fan fiction. No poetry. Alternate history, not entirely taboo, is a difficult sale. Stories do not necessarily have to restrict themselves to robots, rocket ships, and extraterrestrials. However, the science and/or technology must be integral to the story; if you remove the science, the story falls apart, or disappears altogether. If the plot can be easily reconstituted as a western, a swashbuckler, or a bodice-ripper, it is probably not for us, either. We aren’t fixated on political correctness. We don’t object to explicit language, violence, or sexual situations, as long as it is necessary to the plot. We like humor and satire. We really don’t care if you are a minority, transgendered, or purple; the story is the focus and not the author.”

Read more via Perihelion Science Fiction Magazine

4 Super Easy Ways To Create Characters For Short Stories

Create-Characters-For-Short-Stories“4 Super Easy Ways To Create Characters For Short Stories” by Mia Botha | May 3rd, 2017 | Writers Write.

Characters in Novels versus Characters in Short Stories

Creating characters in short stories is the same as creating characters in novels, but once again, when dealing with a reduced word count we have to make our writing work harder. We don’t have 80 000 words to develop a character arc. How can we work with a reduced count and still have a fully developed character?

1. Write Epic Descriptions

Sometimes we only need one line to summarise a character. Find a way to describe them that creates an image for the reader of who they are.”

2. Dialogue

How does your character talk? Vocabulary, sentence structure and how they talk all help us to show character.

The age, level of education and nationality will all influence how your character speaks.”

3. Body Language

Make your characters move. This conveys a lot about them. Make sure to use strong verbs.
Don’t say: the woman walked. That doesn’t tell us a lot about the woman. Rather say: she strode, she raced, she shuffled, she tiptoed. Those all create images and different scenarios.”

4. Internal Thoughts

Internal thoughts are still one of the simplest ways of showing character. Once you are in the mind of a character you can share their motivation, thought processes and backstory.”

“By using a combination of these methods, you’ll be able to convey as much of your character as possible using the least number of words. Tip: Don’t forget to apply to principles of ‘show, don’t tell’ to really pack a punch.

Happy writing.”

Read more via 4 Super Easy Ways To Create Characters For Short Stories

9 Ways Writing Short Stories Can Pay Off for Writers

anne-r-allen-300x300“9 Ways Writing Short Stories Can Pay Off for Writers” by Anne R. Allen | 7th January, 2015 | The Writer’s Dig | Writer’s Digest.

“I thought short stories stopped being relevant for professional writers decades ago, when mainstream magazines such as The Saturday Evening Post stopped publishing fiction; I equated short fiction with those finger exercises piano students do before they graduate to real music. If you’re serious about a career in fiction, you write novels … right?

Wrong. Short stories are having a revival in the digital age. As book marketing guru Penny C. Sansevieri wrote in The Huffington Post, “Short is the new long. Thanks to consumers who want quick bites of information and things like Kindle Singles, consumers love short.” It seems the short story is back—on an iPhone near you.

Here are nine factors working in favor of a short story renaissance:

  1. Small, portable screens are changing the way we read
  2. Anthologies are hot
  3. Publication identifies you as a professional
  4. Networking with short fiction editors can further your career
  5. Filmmakers buy rights to short stories
  6. Online retailers favor authors with more titles
  7. Short fiction contests can build your bio
  8. Shorts keep fans engaged and draw new ones
  9. Today’s short stories make money and hold their value.

Short stories are great for practice, too. Learning to write short can keep your prose from getting flabby. You shouldn’t give up on your magnum opus, but try a few ideas out in short stories. You’ll be grateful you have inventory when opportunity comes knocking.”

Read more via 9 Ways Writing Short Stories Can Pay Off for Writers

Three-Lobe Burning Eye Magazine | Ongoing Submissions

3lbe-submission-guidelinesThree-Lobe Burning Eye Magazine
Genre: Horror, Fantasy, and Science Fiction
Ongoing Submissions 
Payment: $100 for short fiction (2,000–7,000 words) + 1 print annual, $30 for flash fiction (500–1,000 words) + 1 print annual

“Three-lobed Burning Eye (3LBE) is a speculative fiction magazine published online twice per year (Spring and Fall) and print anthology (every other year). Each issue features six original stories, some with audio readings.

What we’re looking for:
Original speculative fiction: horror, fantasy, and science fiction. We want short stories from across the classifications and those dusky places between: magical realism, fantastique, slipstream, interstitial, Weird. We will consider suspense or western, though we prefer it contain some speculative element. We like voices that are full of feeling, from literary to pulpy, with styles unique and flowing, but not too experimental. All labels aside, we want tales that expand genre, that value imagination in character, narrative, and plot. We encourage diverse authors, characters and points of view, inclusive of all races, cultures, genders, and orientations. Please read a few issues before submitting.”

Read more via Three-Lobe Burning Eye Magazine

 

Shoreline of Infinity Magazine | Ongoing Submissions

shoreline-of-infinity-website-banner-300x148Shoreline of Infinity Magazine
Genre: Science Fiction
Ongoing Submissions
Length: “From Issue 8 onwards we will be publishing one story of up to 10,000 words, otherwise it’s a maximum of 5,000 words.”
Payment: £10 per 1,000 words

“We are looking for a good science fiction story. Something that gives reality a tweak on the nose. An idea that makes us stop and think.

But more than that, we want your story to be populated with characters we want to meet and have a drink with or from whom we want to run screaming away; we want characters to hug to ease the pain; we want to read the stories of heroes; we want to be your character.

Make us want to nudge our sleeping partners at 3am in the morning and say: “you should read this!”

Broaden our horizons – look beyond the Shoreline.

We told you, we’re looking for a good story.

If you can include all that in one tale as seen through the powerful lens of science fiction, so much the better.”

Read more via Shoreline of Infinity

Daily Science Fiction | Ongoing Submissions

Daily Science Fiction
Genre: Speculative Fiction (science fiction, fantasy, slipstream, etc.)
Ongoing Submissions:
Length: 100 – 1,500 words
Payment: 8 cents a word

  • We [Daily Science Fiction] need short short fiction, especially flash fiction. Among our featured stories, a shorter tale will get an extra nudge on the scale when weighed against a longer one.
  • … [W]e want your stories to ooze originality, but a well-written story is a must. We are fond of character-driven fiction, though readers point out that not every story we publish fits that rubric. Our goal is to publish the best stories we can that will be interesting, worthwhile reads. Some stories, especially in the short short fiction, will succeed despite lack of plot, character, punctuation, what-have-you.
  • We may purchase dark fantasy, but try not to publish pure horror. We don’t mind feeling the flush of arousal, but will not publish erotica. Guns a-blazing might make our day, but we don’t suspect most military SF will win us over. Humor? We take it, It often works especially for short short fiction, but do keep in mind that one alien’s funny bone is located near another species’ sac of indifference. We’re likely not your best market for longer funny tales.

Read more via Daily Science Fiction

 

Clarkesworld Magazine | Open for Submissions


clarkesworld-magazine-science-fiction-fantasy-submission-guidelines

Clarkesworld Magazine
Seeking: Art, Non-fiction and Short Story
Genre: Science Fiction & Fantasy
Open for submissions
Length: 1,000 – 16,000 words
Payment: 10¢ per word for the first 5000 words, 8¢ for each word over 5000

“Though no particular setting, theme, or plot is anathema to us, the following are likely hard sells:

  • zombies or zombie-wannabes (seriously, I’m not kidding)
  • sexy vampires, wanton werewolves, wicked witches, or demonic children
  • stories about rapists, murderers, child abusers, or cannibals
  • stories where the climax is dependent on the spilling of intestines
  • stories in which a milquetoast civilian government is depicted as the sole obstacle to either catching some depraved criminal or to an uncomplicated military victory
  • stories where the Republicans, or Democrats, or Libertarians, or the Spartacist League, etc. take over the world and either save or ruin it
  • stories in which the words “thou” or “thine” appear
  • talking cats or swords
  • stories where FTL travel or time travel is as easy as is it on television shows or movies
  • stories that depend on some vestigial belief in Judeo-Christian mythology in order to be frightening (i.e., Cain and Abel are vampires, the End Times are a’ comin’, Communion wine turns to Christ’s literal blood and it’s HIV positive, Satan’s gonna getcha, etc.)
  • stories about young kids playing in some field and discovering ANYTHING. (a body, an alien craft, Excalibur, ANYTHING).
  • stories about the stuff we all read in Scientific American three months ago
  • stories about your RPG character’s adventures
  • “funny” stories that depend on, or even include, puns
  • stories where the protagonist is either widely despised or widely admired simply because he or she is just so smart and/or strange
  • stories that take place within an artsy-fartsy bohemia as written by an author who has clearly never experienced one
  • stories originally intended for someone’s upcoming theme anthology or issue (everyone is sending those out, wait a while)
  • your trunk stories.”

Read more via Clarkesworld Magazine

Persistent Visions | Closes: Not Stated

small-ghost-logoPersistent Visions
Genre: Fantasy & Science Fiction
Deadline: Not Stated
Length: max. 7,500 words
Payment: 7 cents a word

“Persistent Visions is looking for fresh fiction that skirts the edges of reality, pushes the boundaries of people we could become, and has an updated, innovative perspective on the people we will become. We’re looking for edgy, raw, unconventional, difficult, speculative fiction stories. You can pluck our heartstrings, but make it a tune we’ve never heard before.”

Read more via Persistent Visions