4 Super Easy Ways To Create Characters For Short Stories

Create-Characters-For-Short-Stories“4 Super Easy Ways To Create Characters For Short Stories” by Mia Botha | May 3rd, 2017 | Writers Write.

Characters in Novels versus Characters in Short Stories

Creating characters in short stories is the same as creating characters in novels, but once again, when dealing with a reduced word count we have to make our writing work harder. We don’t have 80 000 words to develop a character arc. How can we work with a reduced count and still have a fully developed character?

1. Write Epic Descriptions

Sometimes we only need one line to summarise a character. Find a way to describe them that creates an image for the reader of who they are.”

2. Dialogue

How does your character talk? Vocabulary, sentence structure and how they talk all help us to show character.

The age, level of education and nationality will all influence how your character speaks.”

3. Body Language

Make your characters move. This conveys a lot about them. Make sure to use strong verbs.
Don’t say: the woman walked. That doesn’t tell us a lot about the woman. Rather say: she strode, she raced, she shuffled, she tiptoed. Those all create images and different scenarios.”

4. Internal Thoughts

Internal thoughts are still one of the simplest ways of showing character. Once you are in the mind of a character you can share their motivation, thought processes and backstory.”

“By using a combination of these methods, you’ll be able to convey as much of your character as possible using the least number of words. Tip: Don’t forget to apply to principles of ‘show, don’t tell’ to really pack a punch.

Happy writing.”

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9 Ways Writing Short Stories Can Pay Off for Writers

anne-r-allen-300x300“9 Ways Writing Short Stories Can Pay Off for Writers” by Anne R. Allen | 7th January, 2015 | The Writer’s Dig | Writer’s Digest.

“I thought short stories stopped being relevant for professional writers decades ago, when mainstream magazines such as The Saturday Evening Post stopped publishing fiction; I equated short fiction with those finger exercises piano students do before they graduate to real music. If you’re serious about a career in fiction, you write novels … right?

Wrong. Short stories are having a revival in the digital age. As book marketing guru Penny C. Sansevieri wrote in The Huffington Post, “Short is the new long. Thanks to consumers who want quick bites of information and things like Kindle Singles, consumers love short.” It seems the short story is back—on an iPhone near you.

Here are nine factors working in favor of a short story renaissance:

  1. Small, portable screens are changing the way we read
  2. Anthologies are hot
  3. Publication identifies you as a professional
  4. Networking with short fiction editors can further your career
  5. Filmmakers buy rights to short stories
  6. Online retailers favor authors with more titles
  7. Short fiction contests can build your bio
  8. Shorts keep fans engaged and draw new ones
  9. Today’s short stories make money and hold their value.

Short stories are great for practice, too. Learning to write short can keep your prose from getting flabby. You shouldn’t give up on your magnum opus, but try a few ideas out in short stories. You’ll be grateful you have inventory when opportunity comes knocking.”

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The Top 10 Reasons to Write Short Stories

medium_The_Top_10_Reasons_to_Write_Short_Stories“The Top 10 Reasons to Write Short Stories” by Amanda Patterson | 13th October, 2013 | Writers Write.

“Why write short stories?

  1. Practice
  2. It’s a cellular world
  3. Get connected
  4. A way to start
  5. Experiment
  6. Build a reputation
  7. Competitions
  8. Improve your concentration
  9. Nobel reasons
  10. Love.

Read more via The Top 10 Reasons to Write Short Stories

4 Things To Keep In Mind When Choosing A Title For Your Book

Just as a great cover will help sell a book, so will a great title – Source: http://blog.karenwoodward.org/

“4 Things to Keep in Mind When Choosing a Title for Your Book” by Karen Woodward. 13 May, 2013. Karen Woodward.

That’s what I’ve been doing for the past few days, researching how to create the perfect title. I’m kicking myself for not doing this while Chuck Wendig had his Titular Titles flash fiction challenge.

Here’s what I’ve learned so far. A great title is:

1. Easy To Remember

There are few things more frustrating than someone telling me the title of a book they think I’d love and then not being able to remember it at the bookstore!

Help readers out, make the title of your work memorable. Yes, I know, that’s easier said than done but there are a few simple tips.

Alliteration

Have you ever noticed that poetry is easier to memorize than prose? It has rhythm, meter.

Maryann Yin gives these titles as examples: When Crickets Cry and Wildflowers from Winter.

Short

This isn’t always true, but I think it’s best to try and keep a title to four words or less.

For more tips on choosing a title: Karen Woodward: 4 Things To Keep In Mind When Choosing A Title For Your Book