Red Room Magazine | Closes: 1/07/2017

red-roomRed Room Magazine
Genre: Dark Fiction, Horror – Fiction, Non-fiction, Reviews, Interviews, Artwork
Deadline: 1st July, 2017
Length: Fiction – max. 4,000 words, Non-fiction – max. 1,000 words, Reviews – 400-600 words
Payment: Fiction – 3 cents a word ($120.00 max.), Non-fiction/ Reviews – 3 cents a word ($30 max)

Red Room Magazine focuses on publishing dark, disturbing, extreme horror and hardcore, dark crime.

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5 Things Breaking Bad Can Teach Us About Writing

TV_BB_bl“5 Things Breaking Bad Can Teach Us About Writing” by Cris Freese | 26th November 26, 2016 | Writer’s Digest.

“I think the general consensus among those writers who teach the craft is that you must read—and read widely—about the craft of writing, particularly those authors who write in your genre. But I think there’s a lot you can learn about writing from other mediums, too. Specifically television. Every other week, I’ll bring you takeaways from some of the best television shows out there. These are meant to be specific concepts, themes, techniques, etc., that a writer can learn from the show. This post will help you understand the intricacies of plot.

This week we’ll take a look at Breaking Bad. Potential spoilers follow. This post will focus specifically on some crucial elements of storytelling, and how you can use them to develop an excellent plot. Each one of these elements is used successfully in the hit show Breaking Bad. I’ll show you how each one is used in this show, and provide a potential application for your own plot.”

1. Craft Unique Character Motivations
The number one thing you need for a successful and compelling plot is character motivation. Every character in Breaking Bad has terrific motivation for their actions.”

2. Develop Multiple Conflicts
Good plots are nothing without good conflict. With multiple characters who all have unique motivations, you can create conflicts between each of these characters.”

3. How to Use Foreshadowing Effectively
Breaking Bad uses foreshadowing throughout the plot. Sometimes it’s more heavy-handed than other times.”

4. Utilize Flashbacks and Flash Forwards
I don’t recommend using these two techniques often in fiction, but using them sparingly can be effective in creating suspense in your plot.”

5. The Importance of Recurring Plot Elements
Recurring elements are important because they draw plot lines together. They connect stories and people, and they recall to earlier points in a story, or point to something in the future.”

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Do You Need an Author Platform?

author_platforms“Do You Need an Author Platform” by Mia Botha | 16th July, 2014 | Writers Write.

Is it important to have a platform?

An author needs an author platform. It generates sales, it creates awareness, and it builds relationships for future sales. It also gives you credibility and establishes you as a serious writer.It is not only for authors who wish to self-publish. Authors who publish traditionally are also required to have an online presence. Social media interaction and blogging are large parts of the publicity strategy for the publisher. eBooks and eReaders have played a huge role in this.

For any aspiring author it is something you need to establish as soon as possible. Your online presence is where you will direct publishers in your query letters and how you will reach readers if you wish to self-publish. Basically you want to build your following before you publish.

How do you start?

Your blog is your base; which other sites you choose to use is up to you. Spend some time on each one before you decide. You use your social media pages to direct your readers to your blog or website. You can set up a blog using any of the sites. It is free and easy. So easy even I could do it. I got stuck at stages, but Google, or a friend, could always help me out. For your author platform you should think carefully about the topic of your blog or website. You can use it as a showcase, as an informative site for other writers, as a place to express your creativity, or as a window into a writer’s life.

 

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Scout | Ongoing Submissions

ScoutScout
Genre: Science Fiction – vignettes and short stories
Ongoing Submissions
Length: 250 – 2,000 words
Payment: 8 cents a word

Scout.ai, an online community that combines science fiction and journalism, is seeking speculative and science fiction vignettes that illustrate the social impacts of emerging technologies.”

“We’re especially interested in character-driven vignettes that explore the near-term impacts of artificial intelligence, automation, genetic augmentation, and space travel, and the impacts of technology on governance, climate, and social structures. We also enjoy being surprised by original or unexpected topics.

Thoughtful but accessible fiction will constitute the majority of our purchases, but there’s always room for humor. Also, a note that when we say near-term, we’re looking for vignettes that portray what you think will be viable or probable in the next 1-7 years. We realize there’s plenty of variability in that range based on human optimism and pessimism and we’re OK with that.

We often pair fiction with existing Scout reporting, but we’ve also been known to build Scout’s journalistic product around particularly compelling speculative or science fiction vignettes.”

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Perihelion Science Fiction Magazine | Ongoing Submissions

logo-moonPerihelion: Online Science Fiction Magazine
Looking for: Fiction, Articles, Artwork
Ongoing Submissions
Length: 2,500 – 7,000 words
Payment: 1 cent a word up to a maximum of $75 per story
Artwork: 520 pixels wide by 1000 pixels high – $60 per image

“WE ARE LOOKING for well-written, original science fiction, that is, science fiction with a solid plot, a beginning, a middle, and an end (but not necessarily in that order). No fantasy. No horror. No fan fiction. No poetry. Alternate history, not entirely taboo, is a difficult sale. Stories do not necessarily have to restrict themselves to robots, rocket ships, and extraterrestrials. However, the science and/or technology must be integral to the story; if you remove the science, the story falls apart, or disappears altogether. If the plot can be easily reconstituted as a western, a swashbuckler, or a bodice-ripper, it is probably not for us, either. We aren’t fixated on political correctness. We don’t object to explicit language, violence, or sexual situations, as long as it is necessary to the plot. We like humor and satire. We really don’t care if you are a minority, transgendered, or purple; the story is the focus and not the author.”

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5 Elements You Need In Chapter One To Hook Your Reader

“Write Your Novel In A Year – Week 48: 5 Elements You Need In Chapter One To Hook Your Reader” by Anthony Ehlers | 2nd December, 2016 | Writers Write.

WRITE_YOUR_NOVEL_Week_48_5_Elements_You_Need_In_Chapter_One_to_Hook_Your_ReaderGoal setting

  1. Focus on polishing your first chapter.

Breaking it down

Your first chapter is the window to a showroom, beckoning us with a display of shiny new cars that promise adventure, an exquisite new dress in a shop window that hints at romance, or a candy display at a market promising the best sugar high ever.

How do you make sure you entice the reader in? How do you make that first critical chapter a moment of seduction, one the reader will never forget? In short, how do you get them hooked?

①  The first line is your last chance to grab the reader.

②  The world on the first page.

③  An unforgettable character or characters.

④ A challenging or thought-provoking question.

⑤ A last page that promises more.

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4 Super Easy Ways To Create Characters For Short Stories

Create-Characters-For-Short-Stories“4 Super Easy Ways To Create Characters For Short Stories” by Mia Botha | May 3rd, 2017 | Writers Write.

Characters in Novels versus Characters in Short Stories

Creating characters in short stories is the same as creating characters in novels, but once again, when dealing with a reduced word count we have to make our writing work harder. We don’t have 80 000 words to develop a character arc. How can we work with a reduced count and still have a fully developed character?

1. Write Epic Descriptions

Sometimes we only need one line to summarise a character. Find a way to describe them that creates an image for the reader of who they are.”

2. Dialogue

How does your character talk? Vocabulary, sentence structure and how they talk all help us to show character.

The age, level of education and nationality will all influence how your character speaks.”

3. Body Language

Make your characters move. This conveys a lot about them. Make sure to use strong verbs.
Don’t say: the woman walked. That doesn’t tell us a lot about the woman. Rather say: she strode, she raced, she shuffled, she tiptoed. Those all create images and different scenarios.”

4. Internal Thoughts

Internal thoughts are still one of the simplest ways of showing character. Once you are in the mind of a character you can share their motivation, thought processes and backstory.”

“By using a combination of these methods, you’ll be able to convey as much of your character as possible using the least number of words. Tip: Don’t forget to apply to principles of ‘show, don’t tell’ to really pack a punch.

Happy writing.”

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8 Archetypes For Heroes & Heroines (and their Villianous Counterparts)

download“8 Archetypes For Heroes & Heroines” | 2nd August 2013 | Writers Write.

“We found this great resource for writers on tvtropes. If you’re looking for archetypes for male and female characters, have a look at this list. Follow the link at the end to read more, and to find a list of examples.

Archetypes for Heroes

  1. Apollo: The Businessman
  2. Ares: The Protector
  3. Hades: The Recluse
  4. Hermes: The Fool
  5. Dionysus: The Woman’s Man
  6. Osiris: The Male Messiah
  7. Poseidon: The Artist
  8. Zeus: The King

Their villainous versions are as follows:

  1. Apollo: The Traitor
  2. Ares: The Gladiator
  3. Hades: The Warlock
  4. Hermes: The Derelict
  5. Dionysus: The Seducer
  6. Osiris: The Punisher
  7. Poseidon: The Abuser
  8. Zeus: The Dictator

Archetypes for Heroines

  1. Aphrodite: The Seductive Muse
  2. Artemis: The Amazon
  3. Athena: The Father’s Daughter
  4. Demeter: The Nurturer
  5. Hera: The Matriarch
  6. Hestia: The Mystic
  7. Isis: The Female Messiah
  8. Persephone: The Maiden

Their villainous versions are as follows:

  1. Aphrodite: The Femme Fatale
  2. Artemis: The Gorgon
  3. Athena: The Backstabber
  4. Demeter: The Overcontrolling Mother
  5. Hera: The Scorned Woman
  6. Hestia: The Betrayer
  7. Isis: The Destroyer
  8. Persephone: The Troubled Teen”

Read more via 8 Archetypes For Heroes & Heroines 

Image Source: Heroes Themed Entertainment

NeoStock: Stock Photography for Digital Artists

neostock-stock-photography-for-digital-artists-logoNeoStock:
Stock Photography for Digital Artists

We believe stock photography can be done better. Over the next 12 months NeoStock will be producing figurative stock photography, custom-made for Digital Artists and Cover Designers. The website will be launched October 2017.

To stay up to date, add your email address to the form… [on the website]… and we’ll let you know when our libraries are ready!! In the meantime, you can purchase any of our images (before the website goes live!!) via our FB Focus Group.

All the best, Team NeoStock.

For sample images got to NeoStock’s website or their Facebook Group.