25 Things You Should Know About Dialogue

“25 Things You Should Know About Dialogue” by Chuck Wendig | May 2013 | Terrible Minds.

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COROLLARY: “EVERYTHING IS DIALOGUE”

Part of why dialogue reads so easy is because it’s conversational, and conversation is how we interact with other humans and, in our heads, with the world. We talk to inanimate objects, for fuck’s sake. (What, you’ve never yelled at a stubborn jar of jelly? SHUT UP HAVE TOO.) There’s a secret, here, and that is to treat all your writing like it’s dialogue. Write things conversationally. Like you’re talking to the audience. Like you and the audience? Real BFFs. You can abuse this, of course, but the point is that in conversation you’ll use straightforward, uncomplicated language to convey your point — no value in being stodgy and academic when you’re just talking. So too is it with writing, whether it’s description in a screenplay or in fiction, you’ll find value in straightforward, uncomplicated, even talky language. Talk with the audience, don’t lecture at them. Everything is dialogue. Some of it’s just one-sided, is all.

Time for another iteration of the 25 Things series. This, I suspect, may be my last one here on the blog for awhile, but I’m contemplating putting together a small e-book of these lists with some new ones thrown in for good measure (already written part of 25 Things You Should Know About Publishing and Writing A Fucking Sentence). In the meantime, enjoy this one, and don’t hesitate to add your own in the comments.

Previous iterations of the “25 Things” series:

  • 25 Things Every Writer Should Know
  • 25 Things You Should Know About Storytelling
  • 25 Things You Should Know About Character
  • 25 Things You Should Know About Plot
  • 25 Things You Should Know About Writing A Novel
  • 25 Things You Should Know About Revisions

Read more via 25 Things You Should Know About Dialogue

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